Revised plans submitted but York’s oldest bowling green still under threat

Developers have submitted revised plans for the development of the Acomb Bowling Green site on Front Street. The plot is located behind the Acomb Explore Library.

The revised plans can be viewed by clicking here

The main differences in the revised plan are:

  • – 10 as opposed to 11 dwellings are proposed
  • – Change in the layout
  • – Clarification of proposed ground levels
  • – Widening of vehicle access in front of the public house to facilitate deliveries

There is no evidence that the Council, as the owner of the library site and the former allotments next to Chancery Court, is engaging on the future of their parcels of land.

The new plans do appear to provide for a potential access to these areas but fall far short of the hoped for comprehensive regeneration plan.

Council officials were instructed to buy the bowling club land some 10 years ago but failed to negotiate a deal. (The purchase would have allowed the club car park to be used by the Library, although bowling activities could have continued)

Residents of Vyner House have already petitioned against the proposals which would remove not only York’s oldest bowling green, but would also see another area of green space lost from within the Acomb neighbourhood.

Any development should ideally embrace accommodation aimed at older people (amenities are on the doorstep) as well as providing much needed office space for the Library, Police and neighbourhood workers.

There were hopes that a “pocket park”could be incorporated which might include some allotment beds.

Residents can object to the current plans via the Councils planning on line web site click here The planning reference is 18/00586/FULM

Dumping blights back lanes in York

We were sorry to see that rubbish is piled in some terraced streets in the City. Nothing depresses an area more than fly tipping so the Councils robust level of fines are probably justified – albeit sparingly used.

In the Green Lane area yesterday we found two examples of dumping. The area now has 100% wheeled bin operation which has reduce litter drift. But, since the closure of the local recycling centre on Beckfield Lane 6 years ago, problems with dumping have increased. They are exacerbated by relatively high charges levied by the Council for removing bulky waste  

Regular visits by skips to estates were stopped about 2 years go. This decision has also impacted on how tidy our streets are

So something needs to change.

Recycling pont in Acomb Car park needs a “makeover”

Poor commercial storage arrangements at back of Front Street

Rubbish accumulating in Gladstone Street back lane

Rubbish in Howe Street back lane

 

Opposition mounting to Front Street building plans

Pensioners petition against proposal to develop Bowling Green

Acomb Bowling Club

The Council has told the proposed developers of the Acomb Bowling Club green on Front Street that they need more time to come to a view on their proposals. They say that there are access and other problems associated with the proposal to build 11 houses on the site.

comment on planning application

The news came after it emerged that a petition, signed by pensioners in an adjacent block of flats, and objecting to the loss of green space had been lodged with the Council. The pensioners were also concerned about potential noise nuisance from the site.

Sport England have also sounded a warning about the plan highlighting the continued erosion of sports pitches in the Acomb area.

Concerns have also been raised about the impact on the local bat population and other wildlife in the area.

The Council’s own heritage officer has pointed to the historical significance of the site. It is thought that there may be important archaeological deposits in the area.

Comment on Planning application

Although the balance of comments is against the development in its present form, perhaps surprisingly local amenity societies, Ward Councillors and adjacent property owners have so far failed to make their views known.

The proposals – which could jeopardise plans to bring derelict land to the rear of the Library back into use, while providing much needed accommodation for older people – are a particularly poor piece of incremental planning.

Hopefully a more coherent plan for this part of Front Street will emerge now.

Acomb Front Street improvements – report published

More flower tubs are promised

The Council is set to consider the latest report on the future of Acomb Front Street on 3rd July.

The area has had a boost in recent months with fewer empty properties and plans announced that would see several empty upper floors brought into residential use.

Nevertheless, the long-term future of the shopping area remains unpredictable, so investment of up to £100,000 is to be welcomed. Some of the fund will be spent in Haxby.

Back alleys need better refuse storage and cleaning

Part of the money is to be spent on bolstering existing activities with the aim of increasing “footfall”. These include additional grants to the ADAM arts festival and an improved Acomb Alive Christmas lights display.

Additional planters are planned for Front Street as are better signposts (wayfinding)

The Friends of Acomb Green have been allocated £5000 for “recycling area improvements” in the car park although it is unclear precisely what this would involve. (The bins could do with repainting although overfull containers, and litter drift, have been the main sources of complaint).

The Council could make a start by cleaning its noticeboards on a regular basis

A further £23,000 of the budget will be allocated later in the year.

The project has moved forward only slowly over the last 3 years.

The results of our survey undertaken in 2017 revealed that residents had clear priorities for the improvement of the area.

Residents priorities for Front Street 2017

Top of the list was the need for a level pedestrian surface across the whole of the precinct.

Achieving this would have required negotiations with the forecourt owners.

Little progress seems to have been made although consultants are now to be appointed to produce an economic masterplan for the area. They are expected to report in December 2018.

Front Street racial abuse incident – Police seek witnesses

Officers are appealing for information and witnesses following a hate related public order crime.
The incident occurred at Morrisons on Front Street, Acomb when a man was subjected to threatening and racially abusive language.
The offence occurred at around 3pm on Wednesday, 20 June.
Anyone with information which could assist the investigation is urged to contact North Yorkshire Police on 101, selecting option 2, and ask for PC David Ellison. You can also email david.ellison41@northyorkshire.pnn.police.uk
If you wish to provide information anonymously then information can be given to the independent charity Crimestopper on 0800 555 111.
Please quote reference 12180110039 when providing information.

Contact details: DAVE ELLISON david.ellison0041@northyorkshire.pnn.police.uk Incident reference: 12180110039

York’s free WiFi network reaches Acomb’s Front Street

York’s Cityconnect WiFi has expanded its network out to the suburbs this week, as Acomb’s Front Street has gone live to join the city-wide network.

Front Street serves as a strategic location for the expanding network as it sits central to the suburb of Acomb which is home to a population of over 22,000.

 

This, the latest CityConnect expansion, incorporates Front Street into a network covering York’s city centre, Bishopthorpe Road and all 6 of the city’s Park & Ride terminals. This is in addition to the public WiFi available in 14 libraries and 41 council owned buildings.

The CityConnect wireless connection is available 24/7, 365 days of the year, and is completely free to log in to and use. The expansion of CityConnectWiFi comes at no cost to the city’s council and helps to further develop York as a digital city. The network allows those who pass through the public space to access the network from their phone, tablet or any other wireless device and can support high quality streaming services such as BBC iPlayer.

This latest expansion of the CityConnect WiFi, is one of many initiatives which have taken place over the past few years to further York’s digital infrastructure.

July decision day for Front Street investment

Front Street

According to the Councils latest forward programme, proposals to improve the Front Street area will be considered at a meeting taking place on 3rd July.

The report follows on from earlier decisions on how the Councils available investment budget would be allocated.

One of the decisions was to allocate £100,000 to be spent on regenerating the Front Street and Haxby shopping areas.

At the time, the allocation was criticised as being too small to make much difference.

Last year, residents were consulted about how they would like to see the shopping area upgraded.

The most popular improvement was a proposal to provide a “level” surface across the whole of the pedestrian area.

This would potentially include the (privately owned) shops forecourts. We said at the time that this would need the involvement of a dedicated project manager who would have to negotiate agreements with several landlords. Whether improvements of this scale will be included in the July package remains to be seen.

Front Street back lane

The second most supported change, by residents, was improved management of litter and rubbish. There have been ongoing problems with litter and dumpingt in the back lane behind Front Street.

Many residents also wanted to see street furniture refurbished. Some progress has been made on this with cycle racks now added to the painting programme.

As we reported earlier in the week, there are some signs that Front Street is becoming more popular with traders. The number of empty properties has reduced, The Acomb Alive traders group now produces a 6 monthly magazine which has a wide distribution, while the Saturday markets continue to attract shoppers.

What is now needed is a bold and decisive approach to investment in the public realm