What’s on in York: Peterloo – the aftermath, York Lent Assizes, March 1820

Monday March 16th
6:30 pm – 7:30 pm 
Free
On March 16, 1820 the trial of ten of the leaders at Peterloo, charged with conspiracy to overturn the government, opened in York. The trial was nationally reported and the government’s position widely discredited.  In spite this, five were convicted … but of the lesser charge of seditious intent.

Inspired by family history, The Road to Peterloo is about a Britain where the 1815 Peace has rewarded the few but penalised the many, where workers are drawn into mass protest meetings and soldiers, billeted in London to prevent revolution, become caught up in a secretive world of plots and spies.

Join local author, Jacqueline Everett, to discuss the historical background to the Peterloo massacre of August 16, 1820 and its aftermath, and hear readings from her novel The Road to Peterloo.

What’s on in York: Strong Yorkshire Women – Taking risks, standing strong

Sunday March 15th
1:30 pm – 3:30 pm

Join us in York International Women’s Week to celebrate the lives of four strong Yorkshire women.

An afternoon spent celebrating the lives of four Yorkshire women who lived life to the full, taking risks and standing their ground; introduced by their biographers, editors, or themselves. Wendy Rayne-Davis will talk about Saint Margaret Clitherow, Pauline Kirk will discuss the life and work of Rita Jerram, Children’s Rights activist and Githa Sowerby biographer Patricia Riley will talk about her own work, and about Leeds suffragist Isabella Ford who helped found the Independent Labour Party. The event will include short readings and the books will be available to purchase at a discount only at this event.

What’s on in York: Finding the Words – Poetry from Harry Gallagher, p.a.morbid and Susan Székely

Thursday February 27th @ 6:30 pm – 7:45 pm £5

Harry Gallagher is widely published, both in the UK and overseas. His latest pamphlet ‘English Jack’ – a hard-hitting series of poems on where England now finds itself as a nation – has just been released through Black Light Engine Room Press. He was the 2019 BBC Tees poet for National Poetry Day and he runs the north east stanza of the Poetry Society.”

p.a. morbid runs The Black Light Engine Room Press. Middlesbrough poet, historian & outsider artist.

Susan Székely has been writing poetry for over 20 years. She has been a runner-up in BBC Wildlife Magazine’s poetry competition, a finalist in the Borderlines Festival, and has been listed in competitions for Shepton Mallet Snowdrop Festival, Wolverhampton Literature Festival, Ilkley Literature Festival and The Plough Prize. She has been published in Iota, Other Poetry and more recently in Strix. Susan loves reading poetry and the opportunities to learn more, regularly attending workshops, and is an enthusiastic member of the Leeds Stanza poetry group. She is working at putting together a first pamphlet.

Finding the Words is our monthly poetry evening featuring poets from Yorkshire and beyond. Discover new poetry in a welcoming and relaxed atmosphere. Bar available. Booking advised.

Date: February 27
Time: 6:30 pm – 7:45 pm
Cost: £5

What’s on in York: Civic Trust events

A interesting programme of events has been prepared by the York Civic Trust. Mostly aimed at members, there are also some which could attract a wider audience.

Membership of the York Civic Trust is only £30 (click)

Likely to be of particular interest is an open series of lectures commencing in May which traces the influence that settlers and immigrants have had on the City.

The organisers say that in 2021 they will bring the story up to date. Given the present Home Secretary’s policies that may turn out to be a very short lecture.

The Peoples of York, Lecture 1: Arrivals

This is the first in a landmark series of six talks. The lectures will explore how York was shaped by settlers from Europe and beyond from the earliest times. The stories of individuals and the history of familiar places will come to the fore in six enlightening and engaging talks.

Organised by YCT, and supported by York Museum Trust, these fascinating sessions will be open to everyone. The series will launch with an insight into Roman and Anglian arrivals in York. In the autumn of 2020, the stories of medieval settlers will come to the fore. In 2021, we will hear how the city was shaped by the turbulence of 19th and 20th century migrations across Europe, and bring York’s story up to the present day.

Venue: Tempest Anderson Hall, Yorkshire Museum

Ticket cost: FREE
Ticket purchase: https://peoples_of_york_lecture1.eventbrite.co.uk