What’s on in York: Women and Print in eighteenth-century York

Feb _21 Women In Print

York Explore Library :

Wed 21 Feb :

6.15pm – 7.45pm :

£6, or £5 with a YorkCard

Tutor: Dr Kaley Kramer

York’s conscious civic self-fashioning in the eighteenth century was accompanied by an expanding local print industry. Women played an important role in this, particularly Grace White, who established York’s first newspaper in 1719, and Ann Ward, whose business in Coney Street lasted 30 years under her direction.

Join Dr Kaley Kramer as she uncovers the lives and careers of these fascinating York women.

To book tickets please click here.

Macbeth, the North, and 1066 with Justin Hill

Feb _16Justin Hill

York Explore Library :

Fri 16 Feb :

3.30pm – 5.00pm :

Adult £6.50 Conc. £5.50

The events of 1066 are often seen through the prism of what happened in the south of England.

However, the events that lead to the Norman Conquest happened here, in the North, in the struggle between the real-life historical figures of Duncan, Macbeth and Earl Siward. In an illustrated talk, bestselling author Justin Hill recounts this little-known story, which is just as bloody and compelling as the Shakespearean play.

To book ticket please click here.

For more information please visit The Jorvik Viking Festival website.

What’s on in York: The Queens of the Conquest, with Joanna Courtney

Feb _16 Queens Of The Conquest

York Explore Library :

Fri 16 Feb :

10.00am – 11.30am :

Adult £6.50 Conc. £5.50

Think you know the story of 1066? Think again….

Joanna Courtney’s ‘Queens of the Conquest’ series explores the lives of Edyth of Mercia, Elizaveta of Kiev and Mathilda of Flanders in their own quests to promote their homeland, support their husbands and, ultimately, to become Queen of England.

Explore the events leading up to the end of Anglo-Saxon England from a female perspective with Joanna at this special and intriguing talk.

To book ticket please click here.

For more information please visit The Jorvik Viking Festival website.

What’s on in York: Vote 100 – Celebrating the Centenary

Sat _17 Vote 100

York Explore Library :

Sat 17 Feb :

2.00pm – 3.30pm :

£6, or £5 with a YorkCard

Join suffrage historian Jill Liddington, who has researched the Votes for Women era, in this Vote 100 event!

Jill will look at the wide sweep of suffragists and suffragettes across Yorkshire, with a special focus on the city of York itself. She asks: what was special about York’s Votes for Women campaign? And what did win the vote for women over 30 in 1918? An opportunity not to be missed!

To book tickets please click here.

What’s on in York: Louise Penny and Ann Cleeves – More than just murder…

Feb _6 L.Penny & A.CleevesYork Explore Library :

Tue 6 Feb :

6.30pm – 8.00pm :

£6

Join bestselling authors Ann Cleeves and Louise Penny in conversation about their love of stories and the secrets behind their success.

Ann Cleeves is the bestselling author of ITV’s VERA and BBC One’s Shetland. She’s written 31 novels in 31 years and her latest, THE SEAGULL is set in her home town of Whitley Bay. The recipient of the highest accolade in crime writing, the Diamond Dagger, Ann is the Queen of British crime fiction.

Louise Penny is the number one New York Times bestselling author of the Inspector Gamache series, set in the fictional Canadian village of Three Pines. The recipient of virtually every existing award for crime fiction, her twelfth novel, A GREAT RECKONING, was awarded the prestigious Agatha Award, Anthony, Macavity, Barry and Left Coast Crime Award.

The ticket price £6 (includes 99p off paperbacks at the event)

To book tickets please click here.

What’s on in York: Finding the Words with John Paul Burns, Emma Storr and Charlotte Wetto

York Explore Library :

Thu 25 Jan :

6.45pm – 8.00pm :

£3/£2 with a YorkCard

Jan _25Findingthe WordsFinding the Words is a regular poetry evening every month at York Explore Library. Each evening brings together three poets and we aim to include both published writers and those working towards a collection. We’ll have a bar available and readings last around an hour. The evening is also a chance to share and chat, so please feel free to bring any news or information about poetry local, regional or national.

John-Paul Burns is a writer of poetry and essays currently on the Creative Writing MFA program at Manchester Metropolitan University and lives in Manchester. His work centres around images of the road, the coast and fruit–of music history and the cinema–Federico Fellini wandering the earth spreading madness like Dionysus, Foley-sound artist as Demiurge, a dream of following Thelonious Monk. He has appeared in journals such as The North, Poetry Salzburg Review and 3AM Magazine and is featured in the Smith|Doorstop anthology Introduction X: The Poetry Business Book of New Poets.

Emma Storr lives in Leeds where she is a member of the Leeds Writers Circle. After working as a doctor and teacher for many years she is now giving more attention to poetry and writing. She is interested in where science and poetry intersect, particularly in relation to understanding the body. She has been published in The Hippocrates Prize Anthology 2016 and Strix 2 and her poem ’Spring Walk’ was highly commended in the Walter Swan Poetry competition in 2016. She recently completed an MPhil in Writing at the University of South Wales.

Charlotte Wetton is a poet based in West Yorkshire. Her first pamphlet, I Refuse to Turn into a Hat-Stand has been shortlisted for the Michael Marks award, following a spoken word album, Body Politic. She has published in Poetry Wales, Staple, Stand etc.  She regularly performs across the North and will run workshops if the opportunity sounds fun.

@CharPoetry

www.charlottewettonpoetry.wordpress.com

 

Prices

£3 or £2 with YorkCard

Book at any library or online

What’s on in York: 150 years of change to riverside York

Jan _16River York

York Explore Library :

Tue 16 Jan :

6.30pm – 8.00pm :

£6

The rivers Ouse and the Foss have both been vital commerical and leisure resources, but with the ever present threat of flooding. Join Colin Atkinson, retired flood risk manager with the Environment Agency, as he takes you through 150 years of York’s rivers and the changes that have taken place along their banks.

To book tickets please click here.

What’s on in York: DUSK – A Poetry Reading with Ian Taylor

Jan _13 DUSK Ian Taylor

York Explore Library :

Sat 13 Jan :

2.30pm – 4.00pm :

Free

The author will read poems from his recent collection DUSK

Ian Taylor has been writing about the lost landscapes of the North for over forty years – old earthworks, ruined churches, derelict mineworkings, Neolithic barrows and deserted villages. Bringing together the best of this work in a single volume, Dusk is a book about enclosure, famine and deforestation, about bleak moorlands, sunken roads, nettles and cobwebs. Exploring between the pages of history, superstition, myth and the ‘threadbare cloak of folk tradition’, Taylor listens to the drovers, peat-cutters, ironstone miners, seasonal labourers, landless farmers and tramps in whose ‘hollow voice of loss’ he hears a renegade and still undefeated Albion, like a fox running from the ‘cleanshaven faces and privileged profiles’ of the Hunt, the Green Man still dancing in the trees.

‘Taylor’s is an inventive, controlled, authoritative voice, unafraid of the rare but exact word… contemplative, intelligently and movingly eloquent on behalf of those silent people and places for which he invents voices.’

Peter Conradi

‘I.P. Taylor\’s vision of agricultural man shares with Hughes and Heaney a noble poetic ancestry running from Wordsworth to Hardy to Lawrence, but his poetry is all his own because he has lived through his subjects in mud, words and imagination.’

Cal Clothier

‘Ian Taylor was born in Shipley, West Yorkshire. He has been a forestry operative, a market gardener, a farm worker, a drystone waller and a millhand. Winner of the Stroud Festival international poetry competition and the Poetry Society’s Greenwood Prize, his publications include A Poetry Quintet, The Grip, The Passion, The Hollow Places and Killers. He lives in York.

To book tickets please click here.

What’s on in York: Hidden stories of the medieval Archbishops of York

York Explore Library :

Tue 12 Dec :

6.15pm – 7.45pm :

£6

DecemberHidden with over 40 parchment volumes, the registers of the Archbishops of York contain a great many hidden stories relating to life in Yorkshire. Join Gary Brannan, Access Archivist at the University of York’s Borthwick Institute, as he describes just some of these amazing stories.

From wayward abbots and disobedient clergy; to personal expressions of piety and faith; the registers document both the ‘big’ national narratives of history, but also contain evidence of many smaller, everyday stories too. From the aftermath of Magna Carta to the fires of the Civil War, this talk will look at some of the stories hidden (and waiting to be discovered) in this unique archive.

Speaker: Gary Brannan

Gary is Access Archivist at the Borthwick Institute for Archives, York. Previously Archivist at West Yorkshire Archive Service, Wakefield, Gary now cares for the Borthwick’s medieval collections.

To book tickets please click here.

What’s on in York: Book Launch of ‘Forever Now’ by Helen Cadbury

 York Explore Library :

Tue 5 Dec :

6.30pm – 8.00pm :

Free

Dec _5 Forever Now Helen CadburyHelen Cadbury’s Forever, Now charts the lives of extraordinary, ordinary humans, including the poet herself; but also those she has lived among, worked with, observed on buses and trains or discovered in the archives. Sometimes those true beginnings spiral into fiction, sometimes they remain autobiographical, as they tell moving and universal stories of love and loss, grief and new beginnings.

Emily Dickinson wrote that ‘forever is composed of nows’. This collection will affirm the sense that ‘now’ is the only thing we truly have – and reveal it as something to be celebrated and acknowledged, not least in this remarkable book, which offers Helen’s devoted readership a chance to discover the full breadth of her compassion for characters, and talent for telling their stories.

“Helen Cadbury’s uniquely feisty, tender, courageous voice comes across loud and clear in this outstanding collection. I loved it; from the ‘heaven’ of the British Library to that closing image of the poet dancing in her kitchen.” — Carole Bromley

To book tickets please click here.

For further information please call York Explore Library on (01904) 552828 or email york@exploreyork.org.uk