Officials recommend Carlton Tavern be demolished

Carlton Tavern

Planning officials are recommending that the Carlton Tavern pub on Acomb Road is demolished.

Papers published today in advance of the Planning  committee taking place on 18th October reveal that officials believe that there is no planning reason why the proposal, to replace the building with a new care home, should not be approved.

The content of the papers will come as a blow to dozens of objectors to the plan. The objectors will, however, have an opportunity to register to speak at the meeting before Councillors determine the application.

Councillors are expected to visit the site on the day before the meeting takes place.

Objectors to Carlton Tavern plan face deadline for comments

Carlton Tavern

Residents have only a few days left in which to register objections to the proposed demolition of the Carlton Tavern on Acomb Road.

In its place a three-four storey 79 bedroom care home would be built. Associated parking, cycle racks and landscaping would take up the whole of the site which currently includes extensive green space.

Details can be found by clicking this reference 17/00476/FULM

The planning decision committee meeting will take place on 14th September and  32 objections  have already been recorded including two from national amenity societies (the Council for British Archaeology and the Victorian Society) as well as SAVE Britain’s Heritage and the York Civic Trust.

These statutory bodies and heritage experts highlight that the plans have not adequately considered conversion options. The Victorian building is of significant architectural merit and heritage significance within its local setting.  Demolition would therefore harm the character of the area.

The CBA recommends that the developer be asked to consult a conservation architect to produce an alternative proposal incorporating the existing building (which is listed as an asset of community value and has a long history of care provision in Acomb village) and with a design more in keeping with the character of the setting.

Local campaigners are urging residents to record an objection to the demolition plan and to register to comment at the upcoming planning meeting

Car home plan

Old Manor school buildings set to be demolished

York’s planning committee is being recommended to approve an application to demolish the old Manor School buildings on Low Poppleton Lane.

The planning application, which will be discussed at a meeting taking place on 17th August, also contains details of major changes to road junction arrangements in the area.

The changes are necessary to allow new access roads, to the former British Sugar site, to be constructed.

In turn, this will facilitate the erection of new housing in the area.

There have been relatively few objections to the plan although the Council is being recommended to provide mitigation measures to protect the well-being of the bats that live in the school building.

Latest planning applications for the Westfield Ward

Below is the latest planning application received by the York Council for the Westfield ward.

Full details can be found by clicking the words highlighted in blue

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226 Thoresby Road York YO24 3ER

Two storey and single storey rear extension

Ref. No: 17/01291/FUL 

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The Acomb Kingsway West York YO24 3BA

Display of 2no. internally illuminated fascia signs and 1no. non illuminated message board

Ref. No: 17/01275/ADV 

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7 Askham Croft York YO24 3FD

Single storey rear extension

Reference           17/01524/FUL

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 Representations can be made in favour of, or in objection to, any application via the Planning on line web site.  http://planningaccess.york.gov.uk/online-applications/

NB. The Council now no longer routinely consults neighbours by letter when an application is received

York Council announces public consultation arrangements for the Castle Gateway project

 

A consultation to shape a masterplan and vision for the Castle Gateway area of York has been launched.

In response to resident feedback on previous public consultations, City of York Council has teamed up with a local group called My Future York to develop a new form of public engagement.

The ‘My Castle Gateway’ consultation will be supported with events, talks and walks and residents will be able to contribute to the debate via Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. Residents can sign up now for the first in a series of guided walks around the area on July 22.

The open conversation will promote new ideas and explore the current high-level vision which proposes a major development of that area that includes Piccadilly, the Coppergate Shopping Centre, The Eye of York, St George’s Field and the Foss Basin. Initial ideas include the closure of Castle Car Park to create new public spaces, buildings, riverside walkways and a pedestrian/cycle bridge.

In collaboration with the council, My Future York through Helen Graham (University of Leeds) and Phil Bixby (local architect specialising in public engagement) are offering their time to deliver the ‘My Castle Gateway’ project. 

My Future York have developed a ‘three step approach’ to public engagement, which aims to develop a preferred masterplan option for the Castle Gateway by the end of the year.

  • Step 1: Creative community-led events to establish what is important about the area.
  • Step 2: Community-led ‘action inquiries’ to resolve any disagreements or uncertainty about the area’s use.
  • Step 3: Community action throughout the decision-making, delivery and handover phases of the project.

Residents can sign up now for the ‘Opening Up Castle Gateway’ walks on 22 July via http://mycastlegateway.org/events/.

They can also join the conversation on:

twitter @MyCastlGateway

instagram @mycastlegateway

facebook.com/mycastlegateway

Latest Local Plan forecasts 20% growth in size of York by 2032

Papers published for a meeting taking place on 13th July say that an additional 19,000 homes should be built in the City before 2032.

Of the target of 953 dwellings per year, around 80 per annum (10%) have been added in order to make housing more “affordable”.

The papers are coy about where the additional 35,000 residents will come from.

Previous drafts have identified immigration as the main source of new labour, although this seems to be in conflict with the present governments polices. Around 2000 inward migrants have arrived in the City in each of the last five years.

A map of the proposed land allocations can be viewed by clicking here

Proposed land allocations – click to access

Hopes that the identification of more building land at threatened MOD sites (Fulford Road and Strensall) would reduce the pressure to build on green fields sites, like the Lowfields playing fields, have been dashed. Officials are recommending that the additional 1392 homes that could be built there over the next 15 years will simply add to the target housing  completion rate (satisfying the increased annual building target of 953 homes per year).

Average housing building rates in York have been about 700 pa over the last 5 years, although last year over 1100 homes were completed. Most homes built in York over the last decade have been erected on what are known, to the planng world, as “windfall sites”; meaning they were not identified as housing development land in local plans.

House prices and building rates

There are currently 3758 planning permissions for homes which remain unimplemented.

The Local Plan remains vague about how growth of the order proposed can be accommodated without serious -and very costly – improvements in infrastructure (notably, transport and healthcare).

Westfield

The new proposals have little direct impact for the Westfield area. None of the land between the existing built u-p area and the northern by pass is slated for development.

However officials have changed the proposals for the development of the playing fields at Lowfields. They are incorporating the plans favoured by some Councillors which would see the number of dwellings built increased from 137 to 162.

There were 10 objections to development of the Lowfields playing field (including Sport England) while only 3 representations were made in support of the Councils plans.

Extract from Council report covering Lowfields devlopment

 

 

 

More planning appeals successful in York

There has been a small increase in the number of successful planning appeals considered in York during the last year,

Among the appeals against refusals by the local planning committee were cases in Monkton Road, Bishopthorpe and Heathfield Road,

Appeals were rejected for applications at the Acomb Hotel (signage) and Poppleton Garden Centre (car wash)

Three more homes for Mayfield Grove?

The planning committee is being recommended to approve the construction of 3 homes on a site in Mayfield Grove. A similar application earlier in the year was deferred pending receipt of a bat study.

That study has now been provided.

If approved at a meeting taking place on 6th July, the houses would replace an existing bungalow located towards the front of the site with its main garden to the rear.

There would be a semi-detached pair of 4 bedroom dwellings at the front of the site on the footprint of the existing bungalow and a single detached 2 bedroom bungalow to the rear.

Vehicle access would be from Mayfield Grove, via newly created parking areas and private driveway to the rear property.

The local planning panel had criticised the plans saying that they represent an over development of the area.

Plans for new development on Tadcaster Road by Wilberforce Homes

Local residents are invited to attend a drop-in session to have their say on proposals by the Wilberforce Trust to build 30 flats for its tenants on land it owns to the north of The Grove, off Tadcaster Road.

The proposals, which include a social/community hub for tenants and offices for the charity, will be on display at the Sunflower Centre at St Leonard’s Hospice on Thursday 6th July from 4.30pm to 8pm. A Wilberforce Trust leaflet (copied below) is being delivered to local homes to publicise the drop-in session.


The Wilberforce Trust is a York-based charity that provides specialist housing and support for people with visual impairments, sensory impairments and other disabilities. Its website can be viewed at www.wilberforcetrust.org.uk

In the most recent draft Local Plan, this piece of land had been provisionally allocated for residential extra care facilities in association with the Wilberforce Trust.

Huge 258 apartment conversion planned for empty Nestle factory

Nearly 10 years after the Almond and Cream production blocks at the Nestle/Rowntree site fell empty, plans to turn the building into residential accommodation look set to get the go ahead next week.

The planning committee is being recommended to approve the conversion of the building and as action the erection of a nearby “convenience store”. There will be 37 x 1 bedroom, 205 x 2 bedroom and 16 x 3 bedroom apartments.

5 affordable units will be provided (off site)

Imaginative plans would see the Grade 2 listed library building converted into communal use.

The conversion will make it one of the largest brownfield residential development in the city and should reduce the pressure to build on greenfield sites.

However only 173 car parking spaces are being provided meaning many of the flat dwellers will have to forgo private car ownership (or use a car club). With visitor parking also required we do doubt whether this arrangement will work.

Council officials are suggesting that the first occupiers are offered the following measures/initiatives to promote and incentivise sustainable travel whilst also reducing dependence on the private car;

  • The choice to first occupiers of either a free bus pass or cycle/cycle accessories to the maximum value of £200
  • A contribution of £200 per residential unit to be used towards the provision of a car club vehicle at the development and incentives including free membership and drive time credits per residential unit.

The Council still talks about the vehicular link from Haxby Rd to Wigginton Rd – of which this projects access road would be part – as a public transport link. Many will feel that such a new link could provide more general congestion and pollution relief for the area.

Nevertheless, it presents a bold move forward in addressing the demand for new housing in the City and one that we hope planners will grasp