York residents invited to discuss the latest Talking Point in adult social care

After the successful opening of York’s first Talking Point in the Acomb area, residents are being invited to have their say on the next stage of the programme.

City of York Council is planning to open another hub to the north of the city and is asking residents to attend a community event at Oaken Grove Community centre on Tuesday 22 May between 10am and 12pm.

The second Talking Point is due be situated in Haxby and Wigginton, with the catchment area encompassing Huntington and New Earswick and Rawcliffe and Clifton Without.

York’s first Talking Point opened its doors at Lidgett Grove Methodist Church in late March with a focus on giving residents earlier access to face to face conversations with adult social care staff closer to where they live.

(more…)

Extra funding released for York’s adult social care services

Over £1.2 million of additional funding has tonight been made available to help relieve pressure on York’s adult social care services.

The Executive have agreed to maintain and release £800,000 recurring budget set aside by the Liberal Democrats in the 2018/19 budget, as well as a non-recurring sum of £457,000 in adult social care support.

To date, York has made huge improvements in reducing its delayed transfers of care, as a result of investment that has been already made. Furthermore, many services have been working closely with partners to support people in care and secure their independence to remain at home, avoiding needless admissions to hospital.

In the past year, a number of successful initiatives have made a positive impact on people’s lives  For example, the YorWellbeing falls prevention service, which has had a significant impact in reducing injuries and hospital admissions.  Tonight’s approval could see this service expanded.

Cllr Carol Runciman, Liberal Democrat Executive Member for Adult Social Care, said:

“There is no doubt; the Winter crisis has heaped an overwhelming amount of pressure on the York Teaching Hospital and our adult care services.”

“In response, the Liberal Democrats sought to make significant investment in our adult social care services via the Council’s 2018/19 budget and I am very pleased that the report discussed at Executive tonight demonstrates the positive impact of our investment in those services.”

“Tonight, we have reaffirmed our commitment to support and protect vulnerable residents, particularly in helping them live more independently.  This investment will allow us to extend our already successful schemes and allow us to continue in tackling system pressures within health and social care.”

Additional investment in adult social care in York

Councillors will be asked to release funds of £1.25m for adult social care when they meet on 8 May 2018.

At the meeting the Executive will hear about the approach adult social care is taking with partners to support people with care and support needs, maximising their independence and capacity to remain at home, avoid hospital admission and return home as soon as possible from hospital.

As well as hearing about progress on the work we are doing to increase independence, councillors will be asked to agree to maintain current additional activity and release £800,000 recurring budget set aside in the 2018/19 budget, as well as the non recurring £457,000 adult social care support grant budget to fund further support.

In the past year the council has implemented a number of successful initiatives which have made a significant and positive impact on people’s lives.

They include the YorWellbeing falls prevention service, which has had a positive impact in reducing injuries and hospital admission. The service offers free home safety visits to all residents in Clifton and Guildhall Wards who want practical help and advice to reduce the risk of falls in their home. The release of funds would see further investment in the service expand into other areas in the city  increased capacity to support more residents.

Another example is the council’s local area coordinators in Westfield, Tang Hall and Huntington and New Earswick. The team people access community support, delaying and or preventing the need for statutory services.  Further funding will see the scheme expanded.

As well as continue this work,  a review of these initiatives has informed the following recommendations including increasing the level of reablement provision, maintain seven days a week social work to ensure capacity is available at weekends and promote and maintain the capacity and sustainability of home care.  Investment is also suggested for step down beds to increase the number available.

(more…)

Adopting an ethical care charter in York

Councillors will be asked to adopt the ‘ethical care charter’ for home care workers across the city when they meet next week.

On Thursday 15 March, the council’s Executive will discuss the option to adopt the charter which seeks to establish a minimum baseline for the safety, quality and dignity of care.

The charter was developed and published by UNISON after they conducted a national survey of homecare workers in 2012 and has three stages. In July 2017 a motion was approved at full council asking officers to look at the implications and take a report to Executive.

At the meeting councillors will be asked to agree to adopt stages one and two of the charter which will include:

  • The time allocated to visits will match the needs of clients
  • Visits being scheduled so that homecare workers are not forced to rush their time with clients
  • Clients being allocated the same homecare workers wherever possible
  • Zero hours contracts not being used as the only option. Providers offering a range of contract options to staff to ensure flexible employment options for care workers.
  • Homecare workers being regularly trained and given the chance to regularly share best practice with co-workers and limit their isolation.

Councillors will also be asked to agree for further work to be undertaken to assess the financial implications of adopting stage three which is for all staff to be paid at Foundation living wage and providers adopting occupational sickness pay schemes, with a report to be taken back at a later date.

Councillor Carol Runciman, Executive Member for adult social care and health said: “We recognise the vital job that homecare workers across the city to support our residents. These changes look to help them and support the recruitment and retention of care staff.

“We’ve been working with providers closely on these plans. We know in York that our residents receive a standard of homecare that is well above the national average, these proposals look to promote high quality care services and further increase the standard of care in York.”

York praised for improvements in adult social care outcomes

Data released by NHS England has shown significant improvements in the performance rating of adult social care outcomes in York in the past year.

York is now ranked as 42nd of the 152 local authorities in England, a rise of 81 places from last year when the city was ranked 123rd, with York the most improved nationally.

York was considered a top performer in areas including:

  • Social care quality of life
  • People getting self-directed support
  • Carer-reported quality of life
  • Social care users having as much contact as they would like
  • Carers having as much contact as they would like
  • Carers reporting that they involved in discussions about those cared-for
  • Carers finding it easy to find information and advice
  • Social care users feeling safe and secure as a result of services provided

The Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework report also suggested areas for further improvements including direct payments and people being offered reablement services after leaving hospital.

Councillor Carol Runciman, executive member for health and adult social care said: “It is pleasing that these figures have acknowledged the considerable work done over the past year to improve adult social care outcomes for our residents.

“Whilst these figures are positive we still recognise there is more to be done, but the news shows that we are heading in the right direction.

“Thanks to all our incredible staff and support from partners, who have worked hard to make this progress possible.”

Study on York’s 30 hours childcare trial published today

click

According to the City of York Council, “An in-depth study published today on the Council’s 30 hours free childcare trial, confirms that the council exceeded its government target, secured 100 per cent sign-up from private and voluntary settings and publishes comments from parents involved in the pilot”

The Council says the full report can now be downloaded 

A national evaluation of the trial run by eight councils was published by the government on 17 July and showcases York’s work and partnership with local childcare providers.

This York-specific study by Frontier Economics looks at the work of the council – the only authority to fully implement the 30 Hours free childcare programme in a trial – and details the very high level of participation including childminders.

The Department for Education funded all children eligible for the extended hours and estimated that in York, 1,480 would be eligible. The department challenged York to engage at least 70% of them but the council exceeded that and, by the spring term, 1,678 places had been provided and taken up. Besides indicating the trial’s success, it showed that the number of eligible families in York was higher than estimated.

The case study identified that the reasons behind this success was involving childcare providers and York’s Shared Foundation Partnerships at an early stage to further improve quality and to meet demand for childcare places on this popular programme. The commitment and expertise given to providers by York’s childcare strategy team was also praised.

The case study gives evidence of providers’ support for the 30 hours programme and showed that even when concerns about funding were raised, the providers worked with the programme to make it viable for parents and commercially.

No parents were refused the extended hours.

Over half the York families interviewed said that the additional disposable income the scheme gave them allowed them to afford outings, children’s after-school activities and holidays.

Extended free childcare was first introduced 3 years ago.

More help for elderly/disabled promised by York Council

The York Council will be reviewing the amount of help that it is able to give needy home owners in York when it meets on 19th June.

Recommendations are being made on how increased funding,  totalling  £1.1 million, from the governments “Better Care Fund” will be allocated. This may mean some changes to the Disabled Facilities Grant (DFG) system.

Up to £30,000 can be loaned or granted to qualifying homeowners to make changes to allow disabled people to continue to live in their own homes. The grants have been means tested in the past but that will no longer be the case fro smaller grants in the future.

Typically the grants are spent on:

  • Facilitating access to and from the dwelling or building by the disabled occupant
  • Making the dwelling or building safe for the disabled occupant
  • Access to the principal family room by the disabled occupant
  • Access to or providing a bedroom for the disabled occupant
  • Access to or providing a room containing a bath or shower for the disabled occupant or facilitating the use by the occupant of such a facility
  • Access to or providing a room containing a WC for the disabled occupant or facilitating the use by the occupant of such a facility
  • Access to or providing a room containing a wash hand basin for the disabled occupant or facilitating the use by the occupant of such a facility
  • Facilitating the preparation and cooking of food by the disabled person
  • Improving or providing a heating system for the disabled person
  • Facilitating the use of power, light or heat by the disabled person by altering same or providing additional means of control
  • Facilitating access & movement around the dwelling to enable the disabled person to provide care for someone.
  • Access to gardens

The scope of qualifying works is now being extended to include hazard remedies (such as excess cold), undertaking electrical repair works to a home where a new level access shower or lift is provided and undertaking an asbestos survey and removal of any asbestos

The Council is also simplifying the application process and hopes to reduce the time interval between applications for assistance being made and adaptations being completed.

A more comprehensive guide to the help available can be found by clicking here

 

 

 

York plans for Dementia Awareness Week (14-20 May)

Organisations across York are gearing up for Dementia Awareness Week (14-20 May) with a series of events.

The activities form part of York’s work to become a ‘dementia friendly city’ which is welcoming, empathetic and accessible to people living with dementia and their friends, relatives and carers.

As well as the events taking place across the city, residents will have numerous opportunities to find out more about dementia and the work taking place to help York be a dementia friendly city.

Throughout the week visitors to the customer centre at West Offices will be able to meet with staff at City of York Council and get information and advice for people living with dementia and their families.

Partners in the York Dementia Action Alliance have also arranged a host of events:

·        On 16May the Alzheimer’s Society will have a stand on Parliament Street

·        On 16 May between 2 and 3pm Dringhouses Library are offering a Dementia Friends Session, for more information visit https://www.exploreyork.org.uk/event/dementia-friends-workshop/

·        On 17 May residents are invited between 1.30pm and 3.30pm to a forget-me-not café, Tang Hall, special entertainment and music session. For more information call York Alzheimer’s Society on 01904 567701.

On Friday 26 May, the week after Dementia Awareness Week, City of York Council is supporting a showing of Still Alice Film at the New Earswick Folk Hall. Still Alice tells the story of Alice Howland, a linguistic professor was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease shortly after her 50th birthday. Before the movie speakers from the council, Inspired Youth and Minds in Motion will briefly provide information on some of the local initiatives taking place to support people with dementia. Tickets are available now from the Folk Hall or online via www.filmfolkhall.com.

Martin Farran, corporate director for health, housing and adult social care said: “One in three people over the age of 65 will develop dementia and there are around 2700 people in York living with dementia at the moment.

“These events are all part of our work to help York towards becoming a dementia friendly city. By raising awareness and understanding of dementia we can start to make life easier for those living with dementia, their family and friends.”

Information how organisations in York can support people living with dementia visit: www.dementiaaction.org.uk/local_alliances/2934_york_dementia_action_alliance

York Council tries to clear up £6 million contract confusion

We reported in February that the York Council had let social care contracts worth over £1.3 million pa. We questioned then whether the contracts had been properly advertised, whether they represented value for money and how their success would be monitored.

In a Freedom of Information response, the Council has sought to justify its actions

The number of tenders – advertised through Yortender & OJEU – received for each contract was low.

The details are:

  1. Supported Lodgings – 1 tender. Awarded to Safe and Sound Homes (SASH).
  2. Family Support – 4 tenders. Awarded to The Cyrenians (Community Links) This contract is worth £480,000 over 3 years
  3. Older People and People with Physical Disabilities – 3 tenders. Awarded to Yorkshire Housing Ltd.

In total the tenders are worth £6.6 million over a period of 5 years.

The Council has declined to indicate the value of the individual tenders it received.

All contracts were awarded on 15th September 2016 according to the contracts register. However, the decisions were only published in February 2017 (after the contracts had started). The Council itself says that the contracts were awarded, under delegated authority, by Council officials. The was no member involvement after the Executive meeting on 28th April 2016. The Council claims the awards were decided on the following dates

a) 28th Aug 2016

b) 6th January 2017

c) 15th September 2016

It declines to say why the decisions were not recorded in the decisions register until as long as 4 months later.

It has also declined to make available the minutes of any bodies which considered the contracts nor will it say to which publicly accountable body the outputs against target will be reported.

The required outcomes, for two of the contracts, are expressed only in very general terms. They are more specific for the family support contract (see below)

Contrary to the impression given at the Council’s Executive meeting, the potential service providers were apparently not required to provide their “vision” for the service and its customers.