Team work beats worst of bad weather in York

Cllr Sheena Jackson joined York’s volunteer snow warden network

City of York Council volunteer snow wardens were quick to respond to the snow and icy conditions across the city, rural areas and villages.

Volunteers have been clearing vital footpaths and roads, making sure residents can access local shops and facilities.

Phil McBride, snow warden from Woodthorpe, said: “I’ve been a snow warden for five years and regularly watch weather reports to know where and when to clear. Today, I’ve been clearing the paths around Woodthorpe focusing on those residents who can’t get around so easily. “

It’s important to report empty salt bins although we hope that they won’t be needed again this year

The council’s volunteer snow warden initiative has grown from strength to strength, with 211 volunteers ready to respond to wintry weather. These hardy volunteers are residents who give up their time to clear snow during bad weather. They help out with clearing snow and sprinkling grit on pavements, with Bishophill and Dunnington volunteers coordinating their efforts and operating as a group.

The council provides snow wardens with training and safety advice, together with boxes of salt to use on public footpaths and streets. They are also issued with a snow shovel and a fluorescent ‘snow warden’ jacket.

Cllr Waller, acting leader for City of York Council (and volunteer snow warden) said: “Our snow wardens are a great example of the community coming together to help each other. They go out in cold and icy conditions to clear paths and help some of our most vulnerable get out and about. We’re really grateful for the work they do.

“If anyone would like to be snow warden, please contact 01904 551550 or visit www.york.gov.uk/info/20073/volunteering/894/volunteer_snow_wardens. In the meantime, during weather like this, please carry on looking out for each other.”

So which roads are open in York and where can I find a salt bin?

The York Council provides an “on line” map which shows public service locations. These include the primary and secondary road gritting (salting) routes which are mainly the major bus routes. click here to view (then click “street car”e on the map index and then pick the service you want to see)

The Council also provides an update service on Twitter @yorkgritter

In addition the map shows the location of self help salt bins and the areas covered by VOLUNTEER snow wardens. The latter do their best to keep local paths open but not all neighbourhoods are covered..

Salt bins do not fill themselves so, if you see an empty one, then please report it to the Council  on York 551550 or “on line https://www.york.gov.uk/reportproblems

 

Time to check out your nearest salt bin

Salt bin locations west York 22nd Nov 2015

 

The York Council has a useful – but little publicised – map available “on line”. Go to http://localview.york.gov.uk/Sites/TranStreetCare/#

It shows the location of many local services including individual street lighting columns (with their I/D number and type) plus litter bins and poop scoop bins. It also shows which roads and footpaths have been adopted for maintenance purposes.

At this time of year the map can be used to locate salt bins while also displaying the route that the gritting lorries follow.

You can get daily updates on twitter from the gritting teams https://twitter.com/yorkgritter

The map indicates how many volunteer “snow wardens” there are in the area. There are seven in the Westfield ward

Volunteer snow wardens are residents who give up some of their time to clear snow during bad weather. There are 211 registered volunteers across York. The Council provides volunteers with:

  • training
  • high-visibility vests
  • snow-clearing kits
  • insurance
  • grit

We know that some of the local salt bins have been filled with litter.

If one needs attention please report it at https://www.fixmystreet.com/

 

 

Salt bins – 121 fail to find new parents

snow_wardensThe Council has admitted that only a handful of threatened salt bins have found new sponsors.

The remaining 121 bins are now set to be removed.

  • 31 salt bins are being taken over by Parish Councils
  • 6 are being adopted by Residents Associations
  • 2 others have been sponsored by other groups

Meanwhile the last Council meeting heard that the total number of “snow wardens” in the City has increased to 208.

Their postcodes can now be viewed on a map (click here)

The spread of “snow wardens” across the City is very uneven.

Poor take up for York “snow warden” scheme; one salt bin “saved”

snow_wardens

Only 8 volunteers have so far stepped forward in the Westfield Ward to act as “snow wardens”.

 

With continuing mild weather, the effects of Labours decision, to scrap most salt bins in the City, have yet to be felt.

But clearly most people don’t feel that they should be expected to make up for the Councils irresponsible attitude to safety

Many residents do, of course, routinely clear the footpaths outside their homes of snow but others are unable to do so for health or domestic reasons.

“Snow wardens” effectively formalise this tradition.

Snow wardens are given basic training by the Council. Volunteers are provided with a high-visibility vest, snow-clearing kit and grit (salt) so that they are able to make a difference in their neighbourhoods.

If you like to become a snow warden contact Michal on (01904) 551832, or e-mail michal.czekajlo@york.gov.uk.

The next training session is taking place on Wednesday 4th December 2013, 18:00-20:00 (training and Q&A time)

A map showing the location of snow wardens in each ward can be found by clicking here.

The roads on which Westfield 8 volunteers are located are:

  • Bramham Road
  • The Green, Acomb
  • Milner Street
  • Askham Lane
  • Severus Street
  • Stuart Road
  • Willoughby Way
  • Middleton Road

The map currently shown on the Councils web site appears to be out of date.
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NB. The Foxwood Residents Association has “saved” the salt bin which is located outside the shops on Beagle Ridge Drive.

They have agreed to pay for the bin to be retained and have set aside funding which will allow it to be filled twice (if necessary) during the current winter.