Police move to fill vacancies

Graduates, non-graduates, ‘career movers’ and ‘career starters’ – North Yorkshire Police announces latest drive for police officers

North Yorkshire Police has announced its latest recruitment drive for police officers as it reaches out to graduates, non-graduates, career movers and career starters to apply.

The latest campaign, which is live until 9am on 25 November, comes hot on the heels of a campaign to recruit more PCSOs. 

As announced by the force last month, there are now three new entry routes for new police recruits to get into policing. They are:

  • Apprenticeship: A three-year Police Constable Degree Apprenticeship (PCDA) leading to a nationally recognised BSc (Hons) in Professional Policing Practice. New recruits will be employed by North Yorkshire Police and spend 80% of their time serving and protecting the community while ‘learning on the job’ and 20% of their work time studying towards their qualification through The Open University’s world-leading flexible distance learning programme.
  • Degree-holder entry programme (DHEP): A two-year accelerated route for those entering with a degree in any subject, enabling recruits employed by North Yorkshire Police to train as a police constable and gain a Graduate Diploma in Policing through The Open University at the same time.
  • Pre-join degree: For those who want to get a degree before they join, new recruits can then apply to the force as their degree is coming to an end and then complete a considerably reduced initial training route with their new police employer in recognition of their policing degree.

Deputy Chief Constable Phil Cain of North Yorkshire Police is keen for this recruitment campaign to reach out to all parts of the community in North Yorkshire.  She said:

“It is an exciting time to join policing and becoming a police officer really will give you some of the best and proudest days of your life. Whether you are a graduate or non-graduate, just starting out in your career or are a more experienced and mature individual looking for your next challenge there are various ways to join us, depending on your work, life and educational experience .

“The three new entry routes, and our recently announced collaboration with The Open University, signifies an exciting change in the way our officers are trained and developed throughout their careers – gaining a degree and learning and earning on the job at the same time.

“We’re also continuing to work hard on increasing diversity in our recruitment to ensure our workforce is representative of the communities that we serve. The last couple of recruitment drives has seen us attract the most diverse group of trainees that North Yorkshire has ever had and we’re proud of the progress we’ve made to date.

You can apply to join North Yorkshire Police as a police officer at northyorkshire.police.uk/policeofficer. Applications close at 9am on Monday 25 November.

The Positive Action team can be contacted on positiveaction@northyorkshire.pnn.police.uk

North Yorkshire Police to discuss increase in crime levels tomorrow

A meeting tomorrow (Tuesday) will hear how the  Police, Fire and Crime Commissioner intends to tackle an increase in crime levels in the area.  The meeting will be told that there some 3837 crimes reported during September.

Across the whole of North Yorkshire, including York, the Guildhall Ward had the largest number of crimes (212).

 In York it was followed by Huntington (91) and Westfield (79).

The largest proportion of crimes in York relate to violence (457), followed by theft (390), arson/criminal damage (153) and burglary (120). Perhaps surprisingly only 47 drug offences were reported.

Overall across the county there has been a 2.5% increase in crime levels this year so far compared to 12 months ago. Over the last two years the increase has been 16%. The biggest increase has been in public order offences. Violence against the person offences have increased from 5504 in 2017 to 7747 this year (up 40%)

There has been an increase in shoplifting in York this year. Recorded anti-social behaviour has however shown a reduction (-17%)

The scale of the problems with the Police switchboard are revealed.

222 calls to 999 were abandoned during August.

 There is a similar picture on 101 calls where 6050 were abandoned during July.

Time to answer on both channels improved during September.

The Police, Fire and Crime Commissioner and police staff deserve credit for producing figures which can be accessed via the web. Click here   The sheer size of the county, and its diversity, make it difficult to produce performance stats which are both accessible and relevant to local neighbourhoods.

There is some good work going on at neighbourhood level with police in west York proactively checking security issues this week

There will, however, be niggling doubts about some aspects of crime prevention.

Lack of reports of drug related crime is probably not the right way to access the scale of that issue.

Equally worrying is the failure of the force to recruit up to its budgeted staff numbers. There were estill over 30 vacancies for police officers in the force in September. The police don’t expect to hit their target number (1450 officers) until December. There are also 36 vacancies for PCSOs.

Performance stats for the Fire service can be viewed by clicking here

Police message – Theft from vehicle on Vesper Drive

There have been items stolen from an unattended vehicle on Vesper Drive between 17:30 on the 22nd of December 2018 and 10:00 on the 23rd of December 2018.

If you have any information in relation to this incident please phone 101 and quote NYP-23122018-0142.

When leaving your vehicle we urge residents to remove any valuables from your vehicle and ensure that all doors are locked and windows are closed.

York Police spread the word about illegal motorcycles as action to target nuisance riders brings “significant results”

Officers at North Yorkshire Police will be working with schools, colleges, motorcycle dealers and instructors to cut down on the number of illegal and nuisance motorbike riders on our roads.

They are trying to reach younger riders to educate them about how to stay safe and legal – and warn them of the consequences if they break the law.

It’s part of Operation Confiscate, which was launched in response to residents’ complaints about antisocial motorcycle riders in York.

Residents are urged to help police crack down on nuisance riders by reporting offences on 101 or by emailing snayorknorth@northyorkshire.pnn.police.uk

If possible, please take details of the registration, make or model, colour or a description of the rider or the helmet they are wearing. Information will be passed on to North Yorkshire Police’s Roads Policing Group so offenders can be tracked down and dealt with.

Police Community Support Officers will be visiting the locations to hand out information and talk to riders and other members of the community about how they can help police tackle the issue.

Officers are also carrying out regular enforcement patrols with off-road police motorbikes. They are using information supplied by the public and are targeting hotspots. These currently include the suburbs of Clifton, Fulford and Heworth.

In the last month alone, a number of motorbikes and scooters have been stopped by police in York, including:

  • A motorbike that was seized in Huntington for being uninsured and ridden while it was declared off the road (SORN)
  • A scooter rider who had no tax or MOT. The rider was reported and the scooter has been seized
  • A motorbike rider who has been given a Section 59 warning notice for antisocial riding
  • A scooter rider who has been reported for having no MOT and incorrectly displaying a front L plate
  • A scooter rider who is due to be interviewed on suspicion of having no licence or insurance after a police stop in Clifton

York North PCSO Harl Pattison, who is working on Operation Confiscate, said: “As the operation continues,  we’re seeing some significant results. These results are making a real difference to residents’ quality of life and making their communities safer.

“But we want to prevent illegal riding happening in the first place. So we’re doing more and more work to reach young riders and influence the way they ride.

“By working with other people in the community, we’re spreading the word that riding antisocially or without tax, insurance, an MOT or a  licence is foolish and it won’t be tolerated.

“We’re enforcing the law too, and in the last month alone we’ve been sending riders to court, handing out official warnings or seizing motorcycles. We’re showing riders that the stakes are high, so chancing it could cost them dearly.”

Police are being supported by partner agencies such as the Driver and Vehicle Standards Agency who can carry out roadside checks and make sure the vehicles are roadworthy. If not, prohibitions notices to remove the vehicle from the road can be issued.

North Yorkshire Police is reminding riders to check the following before taking to the road:
(more…)

New Chief Constable for York and North Yorkshire

Some good news from the office of the Police and Crime Commissioner.

Lisa Winward named as preferred candidate for Chief Constable

Elected Police and Crime Commissioner for North Yorkshire Julia Mulligan has today announced that Lisa Winward is to be put forward as her preferred candidate to become Chief Constable of North Yorkshire Police.

Lisa Winward, currently North Yorkshire’s Temporary Chief Constable and Deputy Chief Constable since February 2017, was chosen following a rigorous two-day interview process, including taking questions from members of the public and partners in a Question Time event and panel interviews, on Thursday 26 and Friday 27 July.

The Police and Crime Commissioner will now put her preferred candidate to the North Yorkshire Police and Crime Panel, who have a statutory duty to hold a confirmation hearing to consider Temporary Chief Constable Winward’s suitability for the role. This will take place on Wednesday 15 August.

Campaign launched to reduce anti social behaviour

Cllr Sheena Jackson points out a damaged cycle barrier

Problems with anti social behaviour usually increase at this time of year but recently problems have reached new levels.

A cycle barrier at the entrance to the Thanet Road sports are was knocked over last week. Although there were signs of corrosion on part of the barrier, the responsibility has been placed at the feet of vandals. A temporary barrier is being installed this week,.

Elsewhere in the Foxwood area, noisy mopeds and cars trying to do hand break turns on amenity areas have been reported. We would expect that the police – who didn’t attend a residents association meeting yesterday – will be able to deal quickly with vehicle related issues like these.

Anyone spotting anti social behaviour or potential vehicle offences should report them to 101.

NB. The number of Police officers in the area has reduced over recent years. Crime levels are creeping up.

Call for increase in neighbourhood police profile in York

The next York Council meeting will discuss four motions put forward by the political groups represented on the authority.

  • Liberal Democrat Ashley Mason is asking for more funding for neighbourhood policing. He will get a lot of support for his proposal with PCSO patrols now distinctly thin on the ground in much of the City. 41% of respondents to a recent survey thought that policing in the City was “poor”.

Many highlighted issues with drugs and moped gangs as increasing areas of concern.

The York Council has no direct powers over policing policy (that rests with the Harrogate based Police and Crime Commissioner) but it can be more active in using its powers of scrutiny.

The motion also opposes any reduction in Fire cover. The service has recently been taken over by the PCC.

  • A Labour Councillor wants to close the outbound traffic lane which currently runs under Micklegate Bar. The actual amount of traffic using this route is already regulated with “green” periods at the adjacent traffic lights already relatively short. However, the main criticism of this proposal is that it is being made without any consultation with local businesses or residents. Local road junctions are already congested at peak times so the consequences could be significant. The plan comes from the Lendal bridge closure school of transport planning. Proposals like these need to be considered as part of the next update to the Local Transport Plan. (NB. The Council video, outlining plans to improve the railway station frontage, portray an, almost miraculously, traffic free inner ring road in this part of the City!)
  • The Conservative Councillors have gone to the trouble of restating that they are in favour of free green bin emptying. Many residents would settle, currently, for just having their present green bin emptied.
  • ……& finally, the Green party has come out against, what they term as, “food poverty”. It will probably be difficult to find anyone who thinks hunger is a good thing. The Greens disingenuously suggest that Council officials should write a report saying how the issue can be resolved. Sadly, this is another problem where most of the levers are well outside the control of a local Council.

Council meetings these days are sterile and predictable affairs with all sides posturing and the real issues, that affect street level public service standards, rarely being highlighted.

This can party be traced back to a decision by the last Council which withdrew the option for Councillors to submit written questions (and get a written response).

A limited amount of time is reserved for verbal questions, but these rarely uncover any new facts.

Answers to verbal questions are not recorded in the meeting minutes. The minutes are, in any event, published several weeks – or months – later.

By then the issue has usually moved on.

Crime survey started

click to go to survey

The Police and Crime Commissioner (PCC) has started an “on line” survey which she says is aimed at getting residents views about neighbourhood policing.

In some ways this is well timed as the summer period invariably brings a peak in some forms of crime – notably anti-social behaviour.

We have already seen an escalation in complaints about the “mad moped” brigade while environmental crime (e.g. dumping, dog fouling) are still at high levels. However, they are yet to reach the heights seen last year when the police presence was very low.

Since then there has been a gradual and welcome improvement with more patrols by PCSOs evident.

The survey begins by asking about satisfaction with a range of public services. There will be a suspicion that this will be to allow the PCC to say that the quality of policing is more highly rated than, say, road maintenance. The real comparison is with historical performance.

The effectiveness of policing  has never been the same in sub-urban parts of York since anti-social behaviour activities were centralised into a “hub” at West Offices. Almost overnight communication channels between residents and named police officers were broken, losing a valuable channel of information about the causes of crime and those responsible.  The boundaries of the neighbourhood policing units seem to have been in a constant state of flux.

Lists of local officers need to be regularly updated and included on public noticeboards, social media pages etc.

The local activities web page for York South famously is only updated a couple of times a year, although there are many more things going on than are publicised.

The survey fails to probe whether residents have confidence in the criminal justice system in its entirety. Many reported crimes go undetected while courts seem to lack effective powers to deter repeat offences.

The police seem reluctant to publish performance stats at a neighbourhood level. Information is available at https://www.police.uk/ but accessing it is awkward. Residents Associations no longer routinely receive information. Many Neighbourhood Watch organisations have folded in recent years.

We hope that the results of the survey will be published at neighbourhood level.