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Hob Moor conservation

 Hob Moor has recently been entered into the Higher Level Environmental Stewardship scheme along with Bootham Stray and Clifton Backies, parts of the Knavesmire and Walmgate Stray. This scheme pays land managers to manage the land in a certain way for the enhancement or maintenance of existing landscape features, habitats and historical features.

 

For Hob Moor and the Knavesmire this means the Council will receive nearly £12,000 every year for the next 10 years to help pay for the management of the moor. The majority of this money is for the management of the grassland to try and improve its quality. Over past years the grassland has been deteriorating which is evident in the large numbers of thistles covering the moor. The management will involve more controlled grazing and weedwiping the thistles when the grass has been grazed down to a lower level. North Lane Field will be managed as a haymeadow so will only be grazed once the hay has been removed.

 

In addition to this money Hob Moor will recieve money to gap up and plant hedges around the boundary, which will then be fenced to stop the cattle trampling them. 2 new footbridges will be installed between the Moor and North Lane Fields to allow the cattle to be enclosed or kept out of North Lane Field but still allow pedestrian access and £16,000 will be provided for interpretation on site and online.

Digital TV Switchover Help

In 2011 the traditional TV signal will be switched off in the Yorkshire region and replaced with a digital TV signal.

Many people will already have the equipment they need to receive digital TV, but if you are not sure if you have the correct equipment or don’t know how to get ready for digital TV there is help available.

An explanation of what you need to do to make the switch to digital TV can be found here http://www.digitaluk.co.uk/.

There is also a dedicated help scheme for older and disabled people which is run by the BBC and can help with converting one of their televisions to digital in the run-up to digital TV switchover in their region.

You are eligible for help if you are:

· aged 75 or over,
· have lived in a care home for six months or more,
· get or could get, disability living allowance,
· attendance or constant attendance allowance, or mobility supplement,
· Or if you are registered blind or partially sighted.

Most people will be asked to contribute £40 towards the help but the service is free for people who are eligible and also get pension credit, income support, income-based jobseekers allowance or employment and support allowance.

In the run-up to switchover, every eligible person will receive a Switchover Help Scheme information pack explaining the options for switching to digital.

In the meantime, if you want more information for yourself or someone you know, please log onto www.helpscheme.co.uk

Westfield Ward. Self help salt bin locations: winter 2010/11

    ASKHAM CROFT JCN WATERMAN COURT

    ASKHAM GROVE END OF CUL DE SAC

    ASKHAM LANE OUTSIDE NUMBERS 186 & 188

    ASKHAM LANE AT THE ENT WESTFIELD SCHOOL

    BACHELOR HILL NEAR NUMBER 12

    BARKSTON AVENUE OUTSIDE NUMBER 26

    BEECHWOOD GLADE OUTSIDE NUMBER 1

    BRADLEY DRIVE AT THE SIDE OF NUMBER 25

    BRAMHAM ROAD OUTSIDE SANDERSON COURT HOUSE

    BRAMHAM ROAD OS NUMBER 8

    CHANCERY COURT AT TOP OF CULDESAC BEFORE NO 1

    CHAPELFIELDS ROAD JCN WITH MARTSON AVENUE

    CORNLANDS ROAD OPPOSITE THE WHITE ROSE PUB

    DANESFORT AVENUE JCN MIDDLETON ROAD

    DIJON AVENUE ENTRANCE TO LOWFIELD SCHOOL

    FIR HEATH CLOSE OUTSIDE NUMBER 5

    FOXWOOD LANE JCN BEAGLE RIDGE DRIVE OS SHOPS

    FOXWOOD LANE AT THE JUNCTION WITH ASKHAM LANE

    FRONT STREET OUTSIDE VYNER HOUSE

    FRONT STREET OUTSIDE LIBRARY

    GALE FARM COURT OPPOSITE 23

    GALE FARM COURT IN CAR PARK OFF FRONT STREET

    GRANGE LANE OPPOSITE NUMBER 60

    GROVE TERRACE JCN FRONT STREET

    HOWE STREET JCN WITH SEVERUS STREET

    KINGSTHORPE OPPOSITE NUMBERS 29 & 31

    LINET WAY OPPOSITE NUMBERS 14 AND 16

    OTTERWOOD LANE AT JUNCTION OPPOSITE NO.S 29 / 31

    PARKER AVENUE JUNCTION WITH HOTHAM AVENUE

    PHEASANT DRIVE OPPOSITE NUMBER 14

    STUART ROAD NEAR ENTRANCE TO BIRCH COPSE

    TENNENT ROAD BETWEEN NUMBERS 56 & 61

    VESPER DRIVE OUTSIDE 22

    WOODFORD PLACE BETWEEN NUMBERS 4 AND 6

White Rose Pub

White Rose Pub

Updated 5th November 2010: The building has now been demolished

Updated 13th October 2010: We understand that this empty building has been sold to a property developer.  He expects to submit a planning aplication for the erection of bungalows on the site shortly. It is possible that the building will be pulled down before the end of the year.

The new owners of the White Rose pub have been told to demolish the derelict building as quickly as possible. They have said that they will appoint contractors and hope to start work within the next 2 weeks.

The initiative by the Liberal Democrat team came after a weekend of vandalism to the building which left an unsightly mess. Broken glass was a particular hazard and this was cleaned up on the Tuesday.

However the Council does not have powers to require an owner to secure their property and the developers of the site are not local. Focus understands that they are developing similar redundant pub sites for residential purposes in the East Riding.

A planning application, which is in the name of Neil Farrar (reference 10/01862/FUL), for the erection of 6 semi detached bungalows on the site was submitted in September and could be approved within the next few weeks. The Council is currently awaiting additional details from the applicant.

If approved, specialist accommodation of this sort—which often appeals to older people—would be a welcome addition to the area. The location has the advantage of good transport links and is close to the new community and sports facilities recently constructed next to the High School.

The vandalism of the pub building has been condemned by local Councillors, the Police and residents.

Steve Galloway commented, “although the building had reached the end of its life, the mindless vandalism put the safety of passers by at risk while the building became a blot on the local landscape.

We just don’t need this kind of behaviour in our community.

We are working closely with the neighbourhood policing team to make sure that the reductions in anti social behaviour seen in recent years, are not jeopardised by a few inconsiderate individuals”

Good jobs news

I am pleased to announce the success of the Kingsway West Area Action Project, which aims to increase employment in some of York’s most deprived neighbourhoods.  There has been a significant fall in the number of people claiming Job Seeker’s Allowance in the areas targeted by the Project. Between April and July this year there was a drop in the number of claimants by 21% in Kingsway West, and by 19% in Chapelfields. This is a great success, especially when compared to the city average of 12%.  I think the Project is a fantastic example of how a multi-agency approach pays off, as the City of York Council is required to work with a range of agencies including the NHS, Future Prospects, North Yorkshire Police, York Young People’s Services and the Citizens Advice Bureau. The Project, which was launched as a pilot in Kingsway West in 2008, has since been expanded to the Foxwood and Chapelfields areas, with plans to spread the project to Clifton.

Severus Street waste collection plans

Figures for the Councils survey into residents preferences for waste collection in the Severus Street and School Street areas have now been published.

The options were:

1. Present black bags at the front of their property (with a storage bin available on request)

2. Present a wheeled bin at the front of their property (NB. houses with forecourts)

3. Keep a wheeled bin on their property for presenting at a central collection point. Residents would have to wheel the bin to the collection point in the morning and return it when it had been emptied. Bins would have to be stored in back yards. Help would be available to move the bins for people with disabilities.

The closing date for the consultation was 23rd August. The leaflet sent to residents said that if they did not respond then the Council would assume they were happy with the current arrangements.

The breakdown of responses for each street was as follows:

School Street 9 properties were sent leaflets and the Council received 4 responses (44.44%). Of these responses, 1 resident chose option 1, none chose option 2 and 3 chose option 3

Severus Street—11 properties were sent leaflets and the Council received 5 responses (45.45%). Of these responses, 2 residents chose option 1, none chose option 2 and 3 chose option 3

Changes to waste collection – Beaconsfield Street area

Residents will be aware of the consultation that the Council have been undertaking in Beaconsfield Street, Milner Street and Gladstone Street. The initiatives followed concerns expressed by some residents, on the LibDem “down your way” survey in July, about having to take residual waste sacks though their homes.

Residents received individual leaflets to their home addresses and they were asked to respond giving their preference for one of three options. The options were:

1. Present black bags at the front of their property (with a storage bin available on request)

2. Present a wheeled bin at the front of their property (NB. houses with forecourts)

3. Keep a wheeled bin on their property for presenting at a central collection point. Residents would have to wheel the bin to the collection point in the morning and return it when it had been emptied. Bins would have to be stored in back yards. Help would be available to move the bins for people with disabilities.

The closing date for the consultation was 16th August. The leaflet sent to residents said that if they did not respond then the Council would assume they were happy with the current arrangements.

The breakdown of responses for each street was as follows:

Beaconsfield Street: 73 properties were sent leaflets and the Council received 23 responses (32%). Of theses responses, 9 residents chose option 1, 7 chose option 2 and 7 chose option 3

Gladstone Street: 92 properties were sent leaflets and we received 26 responses (28%). Of these responses, 7 residents chose option 1, 2 chose option 2 and 17 chose option 3

Milner Street: 92 properties were sent leaflets and we received 33 responses (35%). Of these responses, 9 residents chose option 1, 2 chose option 2 and 22 chose option 3

On the basis of the returns above, there are a number of homes that require wheeled bins, and these are likely to be delivered around 10th September. The Council will write to individuals giving details.

If residents wish to change their preferred choice of collection arrangement before 10th September then they should contact the Council on 553226 or via the yourviewcounts@york.gov.uk Email address.

ftr – Residents views

Local residents Mark Waudby with an ftr

Local Resident Mark Waudby with an ftr 

The sometimes criticised ftr bus service, which runs between Acomb and the University at Heslington, has got a welcome boost as it approaches its 5th birthday.

Launched in York in June 2006, the ftr has become a familiar sight on York’s streets. While the size of the vehicle – which seeks to emulate tram standards of comfort – was not popular with some, regular users of the vehicle have given it the thumbs up in a recent survey.

Organised by local resident Mark Waudby, and with the support of local Councillors Steve Galloway and Andrew Waller, the survey asked users of the service for their verdict.

The survey results reveal that nearly 90% of respondents living in the Foxwood part of the City use the number 4 ftr service.

fr-survey.jpg

While 25% felt that the service was not as reliable as it could be, around 80% rated the vehicle as comfortable with a similar percentage saying that they got to their destination quickly.

Most popular feature of the service was the presence of “hosts” (conductors) on board with over 90% liking this part of the service.

Mark Waudby comments, “Although the ftr has been criticised in some quarters, most of the people who actually use the service rate it highly.

The hosts on the service get good marks for customer service while vehicle features, such as air conditioning, set it apart from ordinary buses”.

The 5 year agreement on the use of the ftr in the City comes to an end next year.

Steve Galloway, the Councils executive member who has responsibility for transport in the City, says, ” From a passengers perspective, the ftr will be a hard act to follow, but we are negotiating with First to try to ensure that we continue to have a modern, low emission, public transport fleet operating in the City.

Substantial investments in bus priorities have been made over the last 7 years with recent reductions in journey times, on the Fulford Road corridor, amongst those being recorded.

Further improvements on the number 4 route can be anticipated next year with changes to the Blossom Street traffic signals and additional waiting restrictions being introduced, to speed traffic movements in the area”.

1679 homes in the Foxwood area were surveyed with, so far, 523 responses being received. Not every respondent answered every question

Hob Moor School Safety Proposals

Hob Moor school access

Consultation has started on how access to Hob Moor school can be made safer. Following concerns raised about road safety on Green Lane, it is proposed to introduce warning signing and pedestrian improvements at the main entrance to the School site. These proposals are shown overleaf.

There is little existing signing on Green Lane highlighting the presence of the school. It is therefore proposed to introduce warning signs and road markings similar to those on other arms of the roundabout to ensure that drivers are aware that large numbers of children should be expected at school times.

The multiuse site has several accesses and children travelling from all directions. This results in a lot of pedestrian crossing movements across the vehicular access to the school. Unfortunately, this is also at a point where visibility and footway provision is poor. In order to address this, it is proposed to extend the footway and introduce dropped kerbs to assist pedestrians with pushchairs or mobility aids. In addition, the crossing point will be highlighted with red surfacing.